WHERE’S  THE  BEEF? | Serrano’s Chili Verde

Forget the beef, let’s do pork — Serrano’s Chili Verde
     Easy as Uno, Dos, Tres!

I first tasted Serrano’s Chili Verde over 20 years ago at the Bakersfield Country Club, where I was the General Manager.  It was one of the club’s main dishes and often served as a lunch special.  Fidencio Serranc, the first cook at the club, learned the recipe, an authentic Mexican version, from his mother.  We all looked forward to it.  How simple it is to prepare is the most surprising thing about the recipe.  Whenever he made it, the other cooks tossed tortillas on the open fire to heat, and then spooned in helpings of the Chili Verde, rolling up the tortillas for quick, flavorful snacks.  It happened every time a pot showed up on the stove.

 

Ingredients:
2 lbs. pork butt, cubed
1 large yellow onion, diced
10 cloves garlic, minced
20 tomatillos, outer skins removed
4 large jalapeno chili peppers, roasted and diced
5 Tbs. cumin, ground
2 cans green enchilada sauce
1/3 cup lard
chicken stock, optional
salt & pepper to taste
flour tortillas for service

Method:
Melt the lard in a heavy roast pan or skillet. Add the onion, garlic and pork, browning over medium heat.  Brown the tomatillos in a hot oven.  When the pork browns, add the tomatillos, jalapenos, cumin and the enchilada sauce to cover the sauce to cover the meat, then stir.  If necessary, add enough chicken stock to fully cover the meat. Season and slow cook covered in the oven until meat is tender.

Chef’s note:

Depending upon desired taste, a little more cumin and jalapeno pepper can be added to increase the flavor and heat of the dish.

Serving suggestions:

Serve with flour tortillas and Spanish rice.  This is a very versatile dish and can be used in breakfast omelets, tacos, burritos, enchiladas and meat quesadillas.

YUM!

Chef Len

 

 

 

 

 

 

SAUTEED  CALAMARI  STEAK | Keeping it Simple


                                                  


Calamari – What is it?  It is the body of a large Squid with no head; a great protein food source low in fat often referred to as Humboldt Squid.  It is tough and rubbery and always should be tenderized before cooking unless you use a slow cook method.  Sometimes available fresh in fish markets, but most often purchased frozen.  It can also be purchased online.  The frozen product usually comes tenderized, but I always hit it again with a meat mallet to be sure my finished dish will be tender.  This tenderizing step is similar to my Abalone preparation.  The steaks I use are five to six ounce portions, about a quarter inch thick.  Price per pound fluctuates with market but fairly consistent at $5.00 per pound.  Grab your apron and head to the kitchen – let’s get cookin’.

METHOD:

Thaw steak overnight in refrigerator or to thaw quickly, place in a container of cold water for about 15 minutes until pliable.

TENDERIZING:

Place steak between two sheets of cling film and lightly pound with meat mallet. It is best to pound from the edges and work toward the center. Don’t pound too firmly as the steak will tear and be difficult to work with.  It normally doubles in size after pounding.

BREADING:

Use the standard breading procedure. Dredge in seasoned flour, dip in egg wash, and then place in breading media to coat.  I use Panko, but crushed Saltine Crackers also work well.  During the breading, the thin steak may be a little difficult to work with. Don’t worry if it breaks in two, just bread both parts.  After breading, you can go right to sautéing then service.  The tenderized steak can be refrigerated an hour or so before cooking or wrapped and frozen for future use.  The quality is best if cooked soon after breading.  In many restaurants, it is breaded to order then sautéed.

SAUTEE:

Use Canola or Vegetable Oil.  Choose a frying pan large enough to accommodate the size of the steak. The oil should be approximately a quarter inch deep and brought up to temperature before placing steak in pan.  Do not deep fry.  Oil should lightly sizzle when steak is sautéed and not crackle like a house afire. If that happens, the oil is too hot.  The best way to check oil temp is to lower the edge of the steak into the oil and it should gently sizzle then place the whole steak in. If there is no sizzle, the oil is not hot enough so wait for the temperature to come up.  Sautee on both sides until golden brown, this should not take more than four minutes. If the steak starts to curl during cooking or if it gets an air pocket underneath it, cut the edge or pierce the pocket with a paring knife until the steak lays flat.

FINISH:

When cooking is finished and steak is plated up, drizzle one or two tablespoons of melted butter and a squeeze of fresh lemon over the top. Garnish with fresh chopped Parsley; best served immediately.

CHEF’S NOTE:

If you’re serving several people and don’t have room on the stove, it’s okay to hold the cooked steaks in a 200 degree oven until served (best no more than 10 minutes).  On the yacht, we accompany this dish with fresh tartar sauce or a homemade Arrabbiata Sauce with Angel Hair Pasta.  Dish pairs well with Sauvignon Blanc, Viognier, Chardonnay or a nice Pinot Noir.

Butta Bing, Butta Boom!

Chef Len